Bedlam

An Interactive Fiction Text Adventure Game for the TRS-80 and TRS-80 Color Computer


Cover of the Bedlam Manual for the TRS-80.


Cover of the Bedlam Manual for the TRS-80 Color Computer.


Bedlam TRS-80 Instructions | Bedlam TRS-80 Color Computer Instructions | Bedlam Solution


Where to play Bedlam on-line

Play Bedlam online with the Java based CoCo emulator called Mocha! http://www.haplessgenius.com/mocha/. The game is not included in the emulator so you'll need to use the "Signed Applet" version of Mocha, download the Bedlam ROM for the Color Computer below, then click "Load" in Mocha, choose the "Cassette" tab, select the local option at the top, type CLOADM at the CoCo prompt, find and choose the Bedlam.cas file on you computer, then type EXEC when the CoCo prompt appears again and you are off and running.

View the Bedlam source code

Please check out the Computer Archeology site that disassembles the Bedlam source code and allows you to see exactly how the game designers created the program : http://www.computerarcheology.com/wiki/wiki/CoCo/Bedlam

Bedlam Manuals

Download the PDF of the TRS-80 Bedlam Manual : http://www.figmentfly.com/bedlam/bedlam-trs.pdf.

Download the PDF of the TRS-80 Color Computer Bedlam Manual : http://www.figmentfly.com/bedlam/bedlam-coco.pdf.

The text of both manuals can be found here : Bedlam TRS-80 Instructions and Bedlam TRS-80 Color Computer Instructions

The Solution to Bedlam can be found here : Bedlam Solution

Bedlam Game Roms

Download the Bedlam TRS-80 Game ROM from here : http://www.figmentfly.com/bedlam/trs80roms/bedlamtrs.zip

Download the Bedlam TRS-80 Color Computer Game ROM from here : http://www.figmentfly.com/bedlam/cocoroms/bedlamcoco.zip

Emulators

TRS-80

For PC Users : http://www.trs-80.com/wordpress/emulators/.

For Mac Users : http://macscene.net/

TRS-80 Color Computer 

For PC Users : http://www.trs-80.com/wordpress/emulators/.

For Mac Users : http://www.haplessgenius.com/mocha/

Information about Bedlam

I originally played Bedlam on my TRS-80 Color Computer, from an audio cassette, when we first got it. Years later, through the magic of emulation, I was finally able to defeat the game and escape. I felt pretty good about this achievement until I discovered that there are apparently two other ways to escape from the insane asylum. I created this page in the hope that someone would help me figure out what those other two exits were and this happened!

The original part number for the TRS-80 cassette of Beldam was 26-1917 and the price was $14.95. The original part number of the Color Computer Beldam was 26-3312 and the price was $14.95 according to http://www.tim-mann.org/trs80/tandycat.txt.


Bedlam TRS-80 Instructions

Bedlam Program: 1982 Robert Arnstein
Licensed to Tandy Corporation
All Rights Reserved.
Bedlam Program Manual: 1982 Tandy Corporation.
All Rights Reserved.

Introduction

Bedlam is another new adventure from Radio Shack. There are no hidden treasures to find, no wealth to amass, no score to beat. There is only one goal–get out, if you can. Your success depends totally upon your resourcefulness and your ability to think clearly. There is always one way out, but be warned–the exit changes each time you load the game.

Your computer and the instructions you give are the keys to your escape. Bedlam recognizes commands like GO WEST or GET THE KEY. You can shorten direction commands to WEST or NORTH (or even W or N if you prefer). You don't have to limit yourself to two-word commands.

You can HIT THE DUMB DOOR WITH THE STUPID KEY, or EXAMINE THE GREEN DOOR. (If there are two doors or two keys present, the computer might ask WHICH DOOR? or WHICH KEY?) Add the missing word (including a space at the end of the word).

You may end a game at any time by holding down the [BREAK] key while you press the Reset button. You can erase anything you type by pressing the [CLEAR] key or using the [\\\\] and [\\\\] arrow keys. If you are in the middle of a sentence, the computer will make room for any new text. To make the computer respond to your request, you must press the [ENTER] key after you type your instruction.

To help you escape, you can try enlisting the aid of some of the people you meet. Just remember where you are. Can a man running around painting doors on walls and claiming to be Picasso really help? Can a man who says he is Houdini get you out? What about using "X-Ray" Johnson to burn a hole in the wall to gain freedom? Perhaps the guard dog just needs a little attention. Maybe the nurse or the doctor with the hypodermic needle (if he really is a doctor) can be persuaded to help you.

Their ability to help also changes each time you load the game. Depending on the active escape route, you will either be able to escape without help from anyone, or you will need help from one or more of the people you meet. Some of the inhabitants of Bedlam are neither friendly nor cooperative. They do not get along with other inmates and some will try to stop you from leaving.

The people that can help in one game may be ineffective in another game. If you want an inmate to take an action, type the inmate's name and the action you wish taken (for example, MERLIN MEET HOUDINI or HOUDINI OPEN THE GREEN DOOR).

Some escape routes are not as obvious as others. If you get lost during a game, type: [LOOK] and press [ENTER] to see where you are. To take an inventory of what you have acquired during the course of the game, type: [INVENT] (short for Inventory) and press [ENTER].

There are times during the game when you might be in serious danger. One particular resident of Bedlam can create problems, which only a well-timed [PLUGH] can cure. You must choose your allies wisely from among the people you meet.

Good Luck. I really hope you make it. Who knows? You may even be lucky the first couple of times and get out easily. You may not be quite so lucky the next time you try.

System Requirements

To run Bedlam, you will need the following equipment:

Model I

A Radio Shack 16K Level II TRS-80 Microcomputer
A Radio Shack Cassette Recorder and Connecting Cable

Model III

A Radio Shack 16K Model III TRS-80 Microcomputer
A Radio Shack Cassette Recorder and Connecting Cable

Loading Instructions

Model I/III

It is assumed you have reviewed the general operational procedure for your equipment as explained in your TRS-80 Owner's Manual, Computer Cassette Recorder Manual, and the Cassette Information Sheet, which is enclosed with this package. You should now be aware of how to turn on your computer and load tapes.

Note: If you are using a system with a disk drive, instructions are provided at the end of this section for converting Bedlam to a disk file. To use Bedlam as a cassette program, hold the BREAK key down while turning on the system.

Make sure your Bedlam cassette program tape is fully rewound and the "Play" key is down on the recorder.

Turn on the system. If you are not familiar with the equipment, please refer to your Owner's Manual.

The screen will show: You type:

Cass? (Model III only) Press [H]

Memory Size? Press [ENTER]

READY
>_ [SYSTEM] and press [ENTER]

*?_ [BEDLAM] and press [ENTER]

After the program loads*, the screen will show: *?_. Type [/] and press [ENTER].

*Note: If C* appears in the upper right corner of the screen, turn the computer off, turn up the cassette volume a little, then repeat the loading instructions.

After the program is loaded, rewind the program tape and remove it from the recorder.

Note for Model III Users Only

Extreme caution should be used when executing the [/] [ENTER]. Failure to release the [ENTE] key quickly will result in turning the casette recorder on and the program will not start. If the program does not function, rewind the program tape, then repeat the loading instructions.

Converting Bedlam to Disk (For Advanced Users Only)

Bedlam is designed to operate in the low 16K of RAM. This is also the area where TRSDOS loads. (That's why you have to prevent DOS from loading by holding down the [BREAK] key when loading a cassette tape into a disk system.) To use the program from diskette, you must use DEBUG (plus TAPE and RELO for Model III users) to enter one or two machine language programs to first move Bedlam up above TRSDOS (to store it), then move Bedlam down (to play the game).

Model I

Insert a TRSDOS diskette in Drive m. Insert the Bedlam tape into the cassette recorder. Make sure the cassette is fully rewound and the "Play" key is down. Press the Reset button on the TRS-80. DOS READY will appear on the screen. Type: [DEBUG] and press [ENTER]. DOS READY will reappear. Press the [BREAK] key to enter the DEBUG mode. The screen will fill with numbers and letters. From this point on, do not press any key unless you are told specifically to do so. To make this next portion easier to use, we will go to a different DEBUG screen. Press the [S] key once. The screen now looks a bit less cluttered.

Type: [D8010] and press the space bar once. The line you just typed (D8010) told the DEBUG utility that you wanted to Display the portion of memory that contains the address 8010. In the left column, look at 8010 (the second line from the top of the screen). The horizontal line of numbers (to the right of 8010) must be changed.

Type: [M8010] and press the space bar once. The M (in front of the number just typed) told DEBUG that you wanted to Modify memory, starting at address 8010. Notice vertical lines appeared on either side of the first two digits after 8010. Address 8010 presently contains a two digit hexidecimal value. In the blank area at the lower left corner of the screen, you will see:

8010
00- (The two digit number may not be 00 depending on what programs you may have run recently.)

Each digit can be any number between 0-9 or the letters A-F. DEBUG uses the dash (-) to ask what this value should be changed to.

The space bar is used in DEBUG to store changes. [ENTER] is only used to leave the Modify mode. Do not press Enter unless specifically told to do so. Type the following line exactly (remember to press the space bar once after each pair of digits):

21 00 43 11 20 80 01 00 3D ED B0 C3 00 00

You can now press the [ENTER] key to leave the Modify mode. Look at the line and compare it to the line above. If you find you've made a mistake, type: [M8010] and press the space bar once to re-enter the Modify mode.

You can simply press the space bar till the pair of vertical lines are positioned on either side of the incorrect entry. Type the correct two digits and press the space bar to store the change. After the changes are made, press [ENTER] to exit the Modify mode at this address. There is one more program left to write.

Type: [DBD30] and press the space bar to Display the part of memory containing the starting address DB30 (the fourth line from the top of the screen. Next, type the Modify command: [MBD30] and press the space bar. Here are the new values that must be entered for each line. The markers will drop to the next line automatically as you finish each line. Remember to press the space bar after each two digits.

BD30 F3 AF 21 D2 06 11 00 40 01 36 00 ED B0 3D 3D 20
BD40 F1 06 27 12 13 10 FC AF 32 1D 40 21 54 BD 22 16
BD50 40 C3 75 00 3E 07 32 1D 40 21 E3 03 22 16 40 21
BD60 20 80 11 00 43 01 00 3D ED B0 C3 00 43

Press [ENTER] to exit the Modify mode. Check the changed lines carefully. If there are any errors, go back to Modify (MBD30, MBD40, MBD50, or MBD60) and make any changes. You can press the space bar to skip the correct portions of the line. Press [ENTER] to exit the Modify mode at this section of memory.

You are now finished with DEBUG. (You've just written two machine language relocation programs—Congratulations!!) While holding down the [BREAK] key, press the Reset button to go to BASIC.

Press [ENTER] to answer the MEM0RY SIZE? question. At READY >_,type [SYSTEM] and press [ENTER]. *?_ will appear. Type [BEDLAM] and press [ENTER]. The Bedlam program tape will start to load. After Bedlam is loaded, *?_ will reappear. Type [/32784] and press [ENTER]. The computer will return to DOS READY.

At DOS READY, type the following line exactly, without spaces (except for the two spaces shown:

DUMP BEDLAM/CMD (START=X'8020',END=X'0BD3F',TRA=X'0BD30')

and press [ENTER] . The Bedlam program will be transferred to diskette (under the file name, BEDLAM/CMD). To run Bedlam, just type [BEDLAM] and press [ENTER] at DOS READY.

Model III

Insert a TRSDOS diskette in Drive 0. Insert the Bedlam tape into the cassette recorder. Make sure the cassette is fully rewound and the "Play" key is down. Press the Reset button on the TRS-80. TRSDOS Ready will appear on the screen. Type:

TAPE (S=T,D=D) and press [ENTER]. Press [H] in response to the Cass? question. The screen will show:

Device = Tape to Disk
Press ANY key when Cassette ready

Press the [ENTER] key. The recorder will start and in a moment, you will see the word BEDLAM at the bottom of the screen. The loading ** will flash in the upper right corner of the screen. After Bedlam is saved to disk, TRSDOS Ready will reappear. Type:

RELO BEDLAM/CMD (ADD=8020)

and press [ENTER]. After TRSDOS Ready appears, type:

LOAD BEDLAM/CMD

and press [ENTER]. After TRSDOS Ready reappears, type: [DEBUG] and press [ENTER]. The screen will fill with numbers and letters. From this point on, do not press any key unless you are told specifically to do so.

Press [M].

The program will respond with M ADDRESS? =. Type: [BD30] and press the space bar once. The M (in front of the number just typed) told DEBUG that you wanted to Modify memory, starting at address BD30. Look at the fourth line from the top of the screen. Notice the solid white block over the first two digits (after BD30). Address BD30 presently contains a two digit hexidecimal value. You are going to change that value and the value of the numbers that follow.

[ENTER] is used to leave the Modify mode. Do not press Enter unless told to do so. Type the following line exactly, without any spaces. (The numbers are shown here separated in groups of four for ease of entry, since that is how they appear on the screen):

F321 2080 1100 4301 003D EDB0 C300 43

Look at the line and compare it to the line above. If it's correct, you can press

[ENTER] to leave the Modify mode. If you find you've made a mistake, you can simply use the arrow keys to move the white block over to where it is covering the incorrect entry. Make any corrections needed. Press [ENTER] to exit the Modify mode.

You are now finished with DEBUG. (You've just written a machine language relocation program—Congratulations!!) Press [Q] for Quit to go to TRSDOS Ready.

At TRSDOS Ready, enter the following line exactly without any spaces (except for the two spaces shown:

DUMP BEDLAM/CMD (START=8020,END=0BD3F,TRA=0BD30)

and press [ENTER]. The Bedlam program is now properly moved to diskette under the file name, BEDLAM/CMD. To run Bedlam, just type [B][E][D][L][A][M] and press [ENTER] at TRSDOS Ready.


Bedlam TRS-80 Color Computer Instructions

Bedlam Program
1982 Robert Arnstein
Licensed to Tandy Corporation
All Rights Reserved.
Bedlam Program Manual:
1982 Tandy Corporation
All Rights Reserved.

Introduction

Bedlam is another new adventure from Radio Shack. There are no hidden treasures to find, no wealth to amass, no score to beat. There is only one goal-get out, if you can. Your success depends totally upon your resourcefulness, and your ability to think clearly. There is only one way out, but be warned-the exit changes each time you load the game.

Your computer and the instructions you give are the keys to your escape. Bedlam recognizes commands like GO WEST or GET THE KEY. You can shorten direction commands to WEST or NORTH (or even W or N if you prefer). You don't have to limit yourself to two-word commands. You can HIT THE DOOR WITH THE DUMB KEY, or EXAMINE THE GREEN DOOR. (If there are two doors or two keys present, the computer might ask WHICH DOOR? or WHICH KEY?). Add the missing word (including a space at the end of the word).

You may end a game at anytime by typing [QUIT] or [STOP].

You can erase anything you type by pressing the [CLEAR] key or using the 3 and 4 keys. If you are in the middle of a sentence, the computer will simply make room for any new text. To make the computer respond to your request, you must press [ENTER] after you type your instruction.

To help you escape, you can try enlisting the aid of some of the people you meet. Their ability to help also changes each time you play the game. Depending on the active escape route, you will either be able to escape without help from anyone, or you will need the help of one or more people you meet. The people that can help in one game may be ineffective in another game.

If you get lost during a game, type: [LOOK] and press [ENTER] to see where you are. To take an inventory of what you have acquired during the course of the game, type: [INVENT] (short for Inventory), and press [ENTER].

Good Luck. I really hope you make it. You may even be lucky the first couple of times and get out easily. Who knows? You may not be quite so lucky the next time you try.

System Requirements

To [ENTER] Bedlam, you will need a TRS-80 16K or 32K Color Computer, a color television set, a Radio Shack cassette recorder, and connecting cables.

Loading the Program

Make sure that the Color Computer is properly connected to the television. Connect the tape recorder to the Color Computer. Insert the Bedlam tape into the recorder and press the "Rewind" button on the recorder. Press "Stop" when the tape is finished rewinding. Then on the Color Computer and television. Then the television to channel 3 or 4. Press the "Play" button on your tape recorder. Type CLOADM and press [ENTER] . The program will load. When the OK appears on the screen, type [EXEC] and press [ENTER] . Now you can begin your strange journey.

Questionnaire

This questionnaire is not an official psychological test and is not endorsed by any reputable doctor. Only the doctor that you'll find in Bedlam endorses this crazy test. Although the test is mostly for fun, it does have a purpose. Concealed within the questions and score evaluations are clues which should help you escape Bedlam. You may not recognize the clues in the questionnaire until you try to escape from Bedlam.

* 1. Have you ever felt that people were following you?

Yes [___]No [___] Unsure [___] Score [___]

* 2. Do you think you are smarter than most people?

Yes [___]No [___] Unsure [___] Score [___]

* 3. Are most of your friends "weird" in one way or another?

Yes [___]No [___] Unsure [___] Score [___]

* 4. Have you ever thought about writing the story of your life?

Yes [___]No [___] Unsure [___] Score [___]

* 5. Do you get depressed easily or often over "games"?

Yes [___]No [___] Unsure [___] Score [___]

* 6. Do computers seem to be almost "alive" or "evil" at times?

Yes [___]No [___] Unsure [___] Score [___]

* 7. Do you enjoy games that get more frustrating as you go?

Yes [___]No [___] Unsure [___] Score [___]

* 8. Have you ever considered programming as a career?

Yes [___]No [___] Unsure [___] Score [___]

* 9. Would you take advice from someone you thought was crazy?

Yes [___]No [___] Unsure [___] Score [___]

* 10. Does a long, isolated vacation sound good to you right now?

Yes [___]No [___] Unsure [___] Score [___]

* 11. Would you like to know someone with X-ray vision?

Yes [___]No [___] Unsure [___] Score [___]

* 12. Can a door painted on a wall ever be opened?

Yes [___]No [___] Unsure [___] Score [___]

* 13. Do you think that some people in mental hospitals are sane?

Yes [___]No [___] Unsure [___] Score [___]

* 14. Would you accept help from someone who said he was "Napoleon Bonaparte?"

Yes [___]No [___] Unsure [___] Score [___]

* 15. Would you be suspicious of someone dressed in a bloody surgical gown, carrying a hypodermic syringe?

Yes [___]No [___] Unsure [___] Score [___]

* 16. Do you like to pet growling guard dogs?

Yes [___]No [___] Unsure [___] Score [___]

* 17. Would you like to reconsider your answer to question 8?

Yes [___]No [___] Unsure [___] Score [___]

* 18. Are you still a little crazy?

Yes [___]No [___] Unsure [___] Score [___]

* 19. Are you telling the truth on question 18?

Yes [___]No [___] Unsure [___] Score [___]

* 20. Have you ever heard the word "Plugh" before?

Yes [___]No [___] Unsure [___] Score [___]

Final Score [___]

Determining Your Score for Psychiatric Profile Questionnaire

Question 1-People following you

Answering Yes indicates a mild paranoia unless you are a tour guide or drum majorette. Score 6 points for Yes.

Answering No suggests an overly euphoric state of mind which, in today's society, calls for immediate treatment. Score 5 points for a No answer.

You don't know whether or not people are following you? Score 6 points for lack of awareness.

Anyway, once you start playing Bedlam, you'll be glad to have people following you-you'll need all the help you can get.

Question 2-Thinking you are smarter than others

Answering Yes points to a "Superiority Complex," which may be corrected with time and shock treatment. Score 5 points for a Yes Answer.

Answering No indicates a feeling of inferiority, which may or may not be true. Further study is needed, so score 5 points for a No answer.

Unsure shows a very wishy-washy individual. Go back and answer with a Yes or a No, or else give yourself 10 points for your uncertainty.

You had better be smarter than most people if you hope to win this game. Each time you load the game, the exit changes-and there are many possible exits, but only one way out per game.

Question 3-Having weird friends

People collect a wide assortment of friends over a lifetime, so it is very normal to have a diverse, or "weird" group of friends. However, if you choose friends the way you choose games, your friends probably go well beyond the definition for "weird." Score 10 points if you answered Yes.

If you do not believe your friends are weird, it is probably because they are normal and you are one of their "weird" friends. Give yourself 6 points for a No answer.

You can add 5 points to your score for an Unsure answer. If you are not sure about your friends, who can you be sure of?

Once you're in Bedlam, you'll meet a lot of weird people. Some of them may be able to help you get out, while others will hinder your progress. Be warned-the people that help in one game may not be able to help the next time you play.

Question 4-Writing your life story

Give yourself 8 points for a presumptuous Yes answer.

A No answer says that you feel your life is boring and dull and not worth reading about. That attitude is worth 9 points.

Take away 1 point for an Unsure answer.

If you get out of this game in one piece, you'll really have something to write about.

Question 5-Depression over games

If you get depressed that easily, you need help. Add 5 points to your score for a Yes answer.

Add 3 points for a No answer (you'll get depressed trying to get out of this game-and stay sane).

If you're Unsure, score 7 points for being wishy-washy.

Question 6-Are computers ''alive'' or ''evil''

Did you answer Yes? Add 7 more points for your "micro" phobia.

A No answer earns a healthy 1 point, since most well-adjusted "normal" people know computers are just machines and are incapable of such human traits as making mistakes, suffering from breakdowns, or displaying malevolent characteristics (such as refusing to operate just when you need them most).

An Unsure answer adds 6 points since you should know they're just machines that are here to help you.

Once you start playing Bedlam, you'll get over this feeling of computers being almost "alive." As to being "evil," well, just wait and see.

Question 7-Enjoy frustrating games

If you like to be frustrated, Bedlam is for you! Score 8 points for a Yes. If you answered Yes, you may feel differently after you try Bedlam for a while.

A No answer is worth 5 points since people need challenges. A healthy Unsure is worth 1 point.

Question 8-Computer career

Obviously, Yes is 10 points-you have to be crazy to want to work with computers all day long.

If you answered No, why are you interested in this computer game? Give yourself 5 points for not being honest with yourself and change your answer to Yes (which is an additional 10 points).

Unsure is worth nothing.

Question 9-Getting advice from crazies

This is a reverse variation of question 2 and scores the same point values as the second question, but reversed. That means a Yes answer here is worth the same as a No answer there, and a No answer here is worth exactly what a Yes answer there is worth, and of course, an Unsure answer here remains the same as an Unsure answer there, all else being equal.

If you followed the point scoring for this question without any problems, your answer to question 9 should have been Yes. If you answered No or Unsure, add that point value to the point value a Yes would receive, using the point value scoring system outlined above for this question.

Question 10-Wanting a long vacation

Yes indicates a desire to escape from responsibility, which everyone must face. Yes adds 7 points to your score.

No indicates an obsessive preoccupation with duty, and also adds 7 points to your score.

If you are Unsure as to whether you need a vacation, you really need a vacation. Give yourself 8 points for Unsure.

Question 1 1-Desire to know someone with X-Ray vision

A wish to know people with super powers could mean that you select your friends based on their talents. Give yourself 8 points for a Yes answer (and shame on you for wanting a friend that you can use).

A No answer indicates a tendency to prejudgment. Although someone has X-Ray vision, perhaps he has many other qualities which are praiseworthy. Your No answer wouldn't even give him a chance. Give yourself 8 points for a No answer.

An Unsure answer is at least a decent and honest answer, so score 9 points for an Unsure. (It's also a very wishy-washy answer.)

Question 12-Opening a painted door

Your score will depend on whether you answered this question in a real-world sense or in a metaphysical sense. If you said that, Yes, metaphysically, any door (which symbolizes the knowledge of self-worth) that is painted on a wall (which represents the mental barriers that we ourselves create) can be opened (on the intellectual level) to achieve a higher plane or degree of inner awareness and consciousness, congratulations. Give yourself 10 points-'cause you're nuttier than a fruitcake. Answering Yes, in a real world sense, will also get you 10 points (and put away, if anybody hears you).

A No suggests a predisposition for making judgements without considering all the possibilities. Score 9 points for a No.

Unsure is a cop-out - 10 points.

Question 13-Are some mental patients sane

Answering Yes indicates a distrust of the hospital system, and doctors in general. If they ever tried to put a sane person in a mental hospital, the mistake would be found out very quickly. You, for example, would easily be recognized as sane, wouldn't you? Of course you would. Give yourself 10 points for doubting the system. After all, they wouldn't be in charge if they didn't know what they were doing.

A No answer indicates blind trust in the system. How did you make it this far with that attitude? 10 points for a No answer. (Boy, you'll believe anything, won't you?)

Unsure is the same as a Yes answer-10 points.

Actually, any answer to this question scores 10 points. (So there was no reason for you to bother reading this explanation of each score.)

Question 14-Getting help from "Napoleon"

If you answered Yes to Question 13, a Yes answer here would be expected. OK, give yourself only 3 points for being consistent.

A Yes answer to question 13 and a No answer here will add 9 points to your score.

If you answered No to Question 13, and Yes to this question, you have an inner conflict problem. Give yourself 9 points.

If you answered No to Questions 13 and 14, you have an unwillingness to consider all avenues of potential egress. Add 10 points to your score.

Unsure about the whole thing? 8 points for being wishy-washy.

Question 15-Suspicious of people carrying needles

Did you answer Yes? You're darn right. Give yourself 1 point for a Yes answer.

A No answer is worth 0 points-you'll be in enough trouble if he catches you. If he does catch you, there is only one way to recover from what he does to you. (You'll have to find out what "it" is.) The clue can be found in one of the answers to the questionnaire.

You don't want to be unsure about this question. If you said Unsure, give yourself 9 points-and lots of luck!

Question 16-Petting guard dogs

You've heard the expression, "His bark is worse than his bite?" Well, in this case, it's not true. 8 points for Yes.

On the other hand, the dog may simply need to be shown a little kindness, so a No answer may be wrong here and earns you 6 more points.

Unsure may indicate a problem relating to animals. (Would Freud have loved to talk to you!) 9 points.

Question 17-Reconsidering your answer to Question 8

Your answer is of no importance. Did you have to go back and read question 8 over again? You only read the question a few minutes ago. If you can't remember something that recent, you're in trouble. 10 points if you had to go back.

Give yourself 0 points if you didn't have to look.

Question 18-Are you still crazy

If you answered Yes, it is a clear admission of insanity. Take 10 points and add them to your score.

If you answered No, how can you be sure? Since you've just admitted that you once were crazy, you still may be. 10 points for a No answer.

If you are not sure whether you are a cuckoo or not, add 10 points to your score.

Question 19-Truthful about Question 18

It's no good. When you answered Question 18, it gave you away. You have already said you are (or you were) crazy. So how can you know if you are telling the truth? Give yourself 9 points.

A No answer says you lied. A No answer is 10 points and a ticket to the funny farm.

Unsure? You don't know if you lied or not? Come along now. Go quietly. 9 points for an Unsure answer.

Question 20-Knowledge of "Plugh"

You know about "Plugh?" Really? That means you've played adventure games before. It also means you're ready for Bedlam. Here's a darling little number in white for you to try on. The sleeves are a little long, but I think it's really you. 8 points for Yes.

No, you've never heard about "Plugh" before? Too bad, that could really cause you some problems here. Oh well, good luck. (Hee, hee, are you gonna get it.) 3 points for a No answer.

Not too sure about "Plugh," are you? Same score as for a No answer. Too bad for you.

Scoring Results

Add up the score for all 20 questions, and use the following chart to determine if Bedlam is for you.

0-30 points-Indicates you are a healthy, well adjusted, normal person with a very high IQ.

31-60 points-Shows you are a person with several mild neuroses. A prime candidate to try Bedlam.

61-99 points-Wacko! Go directly to Bedlam. Do not pass Go. Do not collect $200.

100+ points-You're kidding. Nobody should be able to score 100 points or more. Get into Bedlam quick.

Note: To those of you who feel the questionnaire made it impossible to ever get a low score, you're right, but your score stands as is. The questionnaire is designed so that many of the questions are absurd or silly. Somebody really sane would never attempt to answer these questions. Not answering a question would result in zero points for the question. If you are crazy enough to answer all questions, you deserve whatever score you get.

Bedlam Solution



Thanks to Kevin Lindley for this great map!

There are three possible endings to Bedlam and which one will work is chosen randomly at the beginning of each game. If killing the dog doesn't work, try one of the other two possible exits.

1) The Storage Shed with the Green Door

In order to win the game this way, you must collect the following items : Blue Pill, Red Key (Use the hook to get it out of the hole), Meat (from the refridgrator), Green Key. The hardest part is getting the green key from the electrothearpy room with the Nurse who likes to strap you down and zap you. What you have to do is get injected by the crazy doctor so that every move you make produces a second, random move. When you get into the electrothearpy room, grab the key and hope that the random move takes you back out of the room. If not, you'll get zapped and have to try again. Once you have the key, find the dog, put the blue pill in the meat, feed the meat to the dog and you see the following happen :


Thanks to Kevin Lindley for the screen shot!

You may have been sane when you entered the place, but after the injection you are far from fine. Of course, if you type 'Plugh' you'll be restored to normal.

 2) The Secret Door

After you have done this

You will get the response:


Thanks to Kevin Lindley for the screen shot!

3) The Painted Door


Thanks to Kevin Lindley for the screen shot!


Bedlam Solution | Haunted House Solution | Madness and the Minotaur

Pyramid 2000 Solution | Raaka-Tu Solution | Xenos Solution


This document was last updated on 5/1/13.

Maintained by Sean Murphy (figment@figmentfly.com)